College students and graduates share a common predicament: insufficient groundwork necessary to find a job.

Despite students” exponential interest in pursuing Computer Science degrees, universities are struggling to keep up with the growing demand for employees with technical backgrounds.

Coding bootcamps are rising in popularity in an attempt to bridge the gap, even for non-CS graduates. They offer an alternative approach to learning, less time commitment, more affordability and a bundle of perks, including individualized mentorship and job placement after completion.

Although nothing can replace a college experience, here are a few reasons we”d argue that completing a coding bootcamp will give you a tech accolade you won”t earn in school:

1. Bootcamps teach the exact skills prospective employers are looking for now

Coding bootcamps are usually partnered with organizations whose primary concern is the shortage of technical talent. Because of this, the material taught at bootcamps is always the most up-to-date and in-demand, as per employers needs.

The hands-on teaching and guidance with online casino real projects prepares students to not just answer “What can you do?” but show it, as well.

2. Students receive job preparation for post-graduate opportunities

Most coding bootcamps implement a period of job preparation for their students. They offer anything from assistance crafting resumes or portfolios, to practicing technical interviews and participating networking events. Oftentimes, students even get to meet directly with companies eager to recruit entry-level developers.

3. Coding bootcamps have a proven track record of success

The main goal of coding bootcamps is to help students land a job in the technology industry after graduation, and according to a survey from Course Report, that goal is far from implausible.

Course Report surveyed 665 graduates of 44 different bootcamps. Here is what they found:

• Respondents reported an average salary increase of $18,000 or 38%, after graduating from a bootcamp. They were also more likely to be employed full-time.

• 79% of bootcamp grads already had BA degrees.

• The typical bootcamp student had a bachelor’s degree, and hadnever worked in software before. Nearly 40% were women.

• Almost 40% of bootcamp students had no programming background before entering the program.

• The average bootcamp tuition was about $11,852.

The numbers are impressive considering the relatively new methodology, and the amount of students who previously completed a college education.

If you”re currently a college student, graduate, or simply a person who is looking for an alternate, surefire way to better prepare for the workforce, download our guide below to learn more.